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Boy Scout Troop 13
(DeKalb, Illinois)
 
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This page contains Boy Scout Awards and the requirments to earn them.
Each of these awards may be earned by Youth and many by Adult Leaders, see the requirements. 

                      
 
    
   
              
    

 
 

  

     Good Turn for America  
  
 
           Ready & Prepared patch  
              
                   
   
   

  

         
           

 Last Updated  Nov 2010

National Honor Patrol


                             

The National Honor Patrol Award is given to Patrols whose members make an extra effort to have the best patrol possible.
Your Patrol can earn the award by doing the following over a period of three months:

  • Have a Patrol name, flag, and yell. Put your patrol design on equipment and use your patrol yell. Keep patrol records up to date.
  • Hold two patrol meetings every month.
  • Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other scouting event.
  • Complete two good turns or service projects approved by the patrol leaders' council.
  • Help two patrol members advance one rank.
  • Wear the full uniform correctly (at least 75 percent of the patrol's membership).
  • Have a representative attend at least three patrol leaders' council meetings.
  • Have eight members in the patrol or increase patrol memberships over the previous three months.

The National Honor Patrol Award is an embroidered star worn beneath the patrol medallion, and will spotlight a patrol as a high-standard group. Help your patrol become a National Honor Patrol.

This award was once known as the "Baden-Powell Patrol Award." 
 



Totin' Chip


          

The Totin' Chip certification grants a Boy Scout the right to carry and use wood tools at Scouting events.

Requirements:
The Scout must show his Scout leader, or someone designated by his leader, that he understands his responsibility to do the following:  

  1. Read and understand woods tools use and safety rules from the Boy Scout Handbook.
  2. Demonstrate proper handling, care, and use of the pocket knife, ax, and saw.
  3. Use knife, ax, and saw as tools, not playthings.
  4. Respect all safety rules to protect others.
  5. Respect property. Cut living and dead trees only with permission and with good reason.
  6. Subscribe to the Outdoor Code.

The Scout's "Totin' Rights" can be taken from him if he fails in his responsibility.

    Scouts who earn the Totin' Chip are encouraged to then earn the Paul Bunyan Woodsman, which is an application of the skills learned in Totin' Chip.

    Even though the patch is shaped like a pocket flap, wearing it on a pocket flap does not conform to uniform standards. Per BSA: "The Totin' Chip Patch is considered a 'Temporary Patch' and, if worn, should be worn centered on the RIGHT Pocket of the Boy Scout Uniform Shirt. It should NOT be sewn on a pocket flap."

 

 

Paul Bunyan Woodsman




Study the Boy Scout Handbook and the Camping merit badge pamphlet, and demonstrate to your Scoutmaster or other qualified person the following:

  1. Show that you have earned the Totin' Chip.
  2. Help a Scout or patrol earn the Totin' Chip and demonstrate to him (them) the value of proper woods-tools use on a troop camping trip.
  3. With official approval and supervision do ONE of the following:
    a. Clear trails or fire lanes for 2 hours.
    b. Trim a downed tree, cut into 4-foot lengths and stack; make a brush pile with branches.
    c. Build a natural retaining wall or irrigation way to aid in a planned conservation effort.

* The Paul Bunyan Woodsman award patch is not for uniform wear and should only be affixed to a blanket or backpack.

Firem'n Chit


         

he Firem'n Chit certification grants a Scout the right to carry matches and build campfires at Scouting events

Requirements:
The Scout must show his Scout leader, or someone designated by his leader, that he understands his responsibility to do the following: 

 

  1. I have read and understand use and safety rules from the Boy Scout Handbook.
  1. I will build a campfire only when necessary and when I have the necessary permits (regulations vary by locality).
  2. I will minimize campfire impacts or use existing fire lays consistent with the principles of Leave No Trace. I will check to see that all flammable material is cleared at least 5 feet in all directions from fire (total 10 feet).
  3. I will safely use and store fire starting materials.
  4. I will see that fire is attended to at all times.
  5. I will make sure that water and/or a shovel is readily available. I will promptly report any wildfire to the proper authorities.
  6. I will use the cold-out test to make sure the fire is cold out and will make sure the fire lay is cleaned before I leave it.
  7. I will follow the Outdoor Code and the principles of Leave No Trace.

The Scout's "Firem'n Rights" can be taken from him if he fails in his responsibility.

Even though the patch is shaped like a pocket patch, wearing it on a pocket flap does not conform to
uniform standards. Per BSA: "The Firem'n Chit Patch is considered a 'Temporary Patch' and, if worn, should be worn centered on the RIGHT Pocket of the Boy Scout Uniform Shirt. It should NOT be sewn on a pocket flap."

Recruiter Strip


 The Recruiter Strip may be awarded to Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts and is worn below the right pocket on the uniform. Typically, only ONE strip is awarded to a boy while he is a Cub Scout, and another may be awarded while he is a Boy Scout.
Follow your units requirements.

Earn the Centennial Recruiter during the 100th year of Scouting

Emergency Preparedness BSA Award


 

Boy Scout and Varsity Scout requirements

  1. Participate in creating an emergency plan for your home and for your troop or team's Scouting activities. Be sure you know the details of both emergency plans.
  2. Earn the First Aid or the Emergency Preparedness merit badge.
  3. With your troop or team, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training conducted by community emergency preparedness agencies.

Venturer and Sea Scout requirements

  1. Complete all of the Emergency Preparedness core requirement number 4 (page 17, Ranger Guidebook).
  2. Do one of the following:
  • Complete the First Aid core requirement (page 16, Ranger Guidebook). This may be fulfilled either by completing the standard American Red Cross first aid course When Help Is Delayed or by completing the American Red Cross Wilderness First Aid Course.
  • With your crew, including its adult leaders, participate in emergency preparedness training coordinated by community emergency preparedness agencies.

Unit Volunteer Scouter requirements
   This award is available to all registered Scouters who serve a unit, including all leaders and committee members. Do any three of the following:

  • Develop an emergency preparedness program plan and kit for your home and be sure all family members know the plan.
  • Participate actively in preparing an emergency plan of action for your Scouting unit meeting place. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  • Put together a unit emergency kit to be kept at your unit meeting location. (This includes all locations where you might have a meeting.)
  • Take a basic first aid/CPR course, or participate as an active volunteer in a community agency responsible for disaster preparedness.
Attachments
Icon File Name Comment  
Emerg Prep Award App 19-602.pdf Application for Emergency Preparedness Award  

Leave No Trace Award


 

The Leave No Trace Award for Boy Scouts and Venturers is designed introduce and expand boys' knowledge of the principles of Leave No Trace.

Boy Scouts and Venturers

  1. Recite and explain in your own words the principles of Leave No Trace, and discuss how an ethical guideline differs from a rule.
  2. On three separate camping trips with your troop or team, demonstrate and practice the Leave No Trace skills appropriate to the trip.
  3. Earn the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges.
  4. Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project that reduces or rehabilitates recreational impacts. Discuss with your troop or team which recreational impacts were involved with the project.
  5. Give a 10-minute presentation on a Leave No Trace topic approved by your unit leader to a Scouting unit or other interested group.
  6. Teach a Leave No Trace-related skill to a Scouting unit or other interested group.

Scouters and Venturing Leaders

  1. Recite and explain the principles of Leave No Trace.
  2. On three separate camping/backpacking trips demonstrate and practice the principles of Leave No Trace.
  3. Share with another Scouter or Venturing leader your understanding and knowledge of the Camping and Environmental Science merit badge pamphlets.
  4. Actively assist (training, advice, and general supervision) a Scout in planning, organizing, and leading a service project related to Leave No Trace.
  5. Assist a minimum of three Scouts in earning the Leave No Trace Awareness Award.
  6. Plan and conduct a Leave No Trace awareness for Scouts, Venturers, Scouters, or an interested group outside Scouting.
Source: The Principles of Leave No Trace for Outdoor Adventures (21-105)

National Outdoor Badges


 

     

Do you enjoy camping under the stars, rafting a whitewater river, or hitting the trail afoot, on a bike, or even on a horse? Can you pitch a tent, find your way, and bandage an ankle using only materials in your pack? Are you prepared to do any of these in rain, snow, sleet, or heat? If so, the National Outdoor Awards are for you. There is nothing virtual about these awards—you can earn them only by demonstrating both knowledge and experience in the outdoors. So, if you are a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout and think you are tough and disciplined enough to hike or ride the miles, camp the nights, and run the rivers or lakes, then read on and see if the National Outdoor badges or possibly the National Medal for Outdoor Achievement could be for you!


 

National Outdoor Badges for Camping, Hiking, Aquatics, Riding, and Adventure

The five National Outdoor Badges recognize a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout who demonstrates both knowledge and experience in camping, hiking, aquatics,riding, or adventure. Scouts earning the National Outdoor badges have demonstrated that they are knowledgeable, safe, and comfortable in the outdoor activity covered by the badge.

National Outdoor badges may be earned in the following areas:

Camping. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Camping upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the Camping merit badge.
  3. Earn two of the following three merit badges: Cooking, First Aid, Pioneering.
  4. Complete 25 days and nights of camping—including six consecutive days (five nights) of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America—including nights camped as part of requirements 1 through 3 above.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 nights of camping. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 nights of camping. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of nights camping.

Hiking. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Hiking upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the Hiking and Orienteering merit badges.
  3. Complete 100 miles of hiking or backpacking under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America, including miles hiked as part of requirement 2.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 50 miles hiked. A silver device is earned for each additional 200 miles of hiking. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of miles hiking.

Aquatics. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Aquatics upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Earn the Swimming and Lifesaving merit badges.
  3. Earn the Mile Swim BSA Award.
  4. Earn at least one of the following merit badges: Canoeing, Rowing, Small Boat Sailing, Whitewater. Complete at least 25 hours of on-the-water time, applying the skills that you learned in the merit badges.
  5. Complete at least 50 hours of any combination of swimming, canoeing, rowing, small-boat sailing, or whitewater activity under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America, including time spent in requirements 2 through 4.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 hours of aquatic activity. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 hours of aquatic activity. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of hours of aquatic activity.

Riding. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Riding upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank.
  2. Complete at least one of the following:
    1. Cycling merit badge and 100 miles of cycling; or
    2. Horsemanship merit badge and 50 miles of horseback riding.
    3. Complete 200 miles of riding activities, either on a non-motorized bike or a stock animal, under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America, including the miles in requirement 2.

    A gold device may be earned for each additional 100 miles of riding. A silver device is earned for each additional 400 miles of riding. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of miles of riding.

    Adventure. A Boy Scout or Varsity Scout may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Adventure upon successfully completing the following requirements:

    1. Earn the First Class rank.
    2. Complete either the Wilderness Survival or the Emergency Preparedness merit badge.
    3. Complete 10 of any combination or repetition of the following adventure activities under the auspices of the Boy Scouts of America:
      1. A backpacking trip lasting three or more days and covering more than 20 miles without food resupply
      2. A canoeing, rowing, or sailing trip lasting three or more days and covering more than 50 miles without food resupply
      3. A whitewater trip lasting two or more days and covering more than 20 miles without food resupply
      4. A climbing activity on open rock, following Climb On Safely principles, that includes camping overnight
      5. Earn the National Historic Trails Award
      6. Earn the 50-Miler Award
      7. Attend any national high-adventure base or any nationally recognized local high-adventure or specialty-adventure program

      Items 3a-g may be repeated as desired. A single activity that satisfies multiple items in 3a-g may be counted as separate activities at the discretion of the unit leader. Similarly, a single activity that doubles an item in 3a-d may be counted as two activities at the discretion of the unit leader. A gold device may be earned for each additional five activities. A silver device is earned for each additional 20 activities. The Scout may wear any combination of devices totaling his current number of activities.

      National Medal for Outdoor Achievement

      The National Medal for Outdoor Achievement is the highest recognition that a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout can earn for exemplary achievement, experience, and skill in multiple areas of outdoor endeavor. In order for a Scout to earn the National Medal for Outdoor Achievement, the Scout must complete the following requirements:

      1. Earn the First Class rank.
      2. Earn the National Outdoor Badge for Camping with a silver device.
      3. Earn any two additional National Outdoor Badges, each with two gold devices.
      4. Earn the following merit badges: Backpacking, Emergency Preparedness, Nature, and Wilderness Survival.
      5. Complete a 16-hour course in Wilderness First Aid from the American Red Cross, Wilderness Medical Institute, or other recognized provider.
      6. Become a Leave No Trace Trainer by completing the 16-hour training course from a recognized Leave No Trace Master Educator.
      7. Plan and lead, with the approval of your unit leader, an outing for your troop, team, patrol, or squad in two of the following activity areas: hiking and backpacking, aquatic activities, or riding. Include in each outing a service element addressing recreational impacts resulting from that type of activity. With the approval of your unit leader, you may plan and lead the outings for another Cub Scout pack, Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, Sea Scout ship, or Venturing crew.
      8. Complete at least one of the following:
        1. Plan and lead, with the approval of your unit leader, an adventure activity identified in the National Outdoor Badge for Adventure for your troop, team, patrol, or squad.
        2. Successfully complete a season on a council summer camp staff in an outdoor area, such as aquatics, Scoutcraft, nature/environment, climbing, or COPE.

        The National Outdoor Achievement Award Application 
        From the BSA website

        Centennial Quality Unit Awards






        The Centennial Quality Awards program is designed to recognize units, districts, councils, areas, and regions in achieving excellence in providing a quality program to a growing youth population in America at all levels of the Boy Scouts of America.


        The emblem is worn on the right sleeve of the official uniform. The top of the award should be placed 4" below the top of the American flag. Only the Quality Unit Award for the current year may be worn on the uniform.


        Qualifying Troops and Packs receive a ribbon for display on their Unit's flagpole.
        Between October 31 and December 31 of each year, a “Centennial Quality Achievement form” is completed and signed by the unit and district leadership, usually a commissioner, after they meet to review their achievements for the calendar year compared to the goals they established at the beginning of the year.
        The achievement form to be completed will help each unit and the district leadership to:
        • Evaluate where the unit is on accomplishing the goals established for each criterion.
        • The meeting will allow the district leadership to meet with the unit leadership before year-end.
        • If the unit has not yet accomplished all of their goals, they will have time to develop an action plan to achieve the award before year-end.

        Crime Prevention Award



                                    

        For a number of years, the Crime Prevention Award has been available to Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, Venturers, Explorers, and participants in Learning for Life, as well as adults. ALL participants - including those not registered in Scouting or Learning for Life - have been eligible to earn the Crime Prevention Award provided they fulfill the requirements of the two phases outlined below, and detailed on the appropriate application forms. 

        PLEASE NOTE: BSA has reduced their emphasis on this program, but has not discontinued it completely. The patch is still being produced, but some Scout Shops™ may not routinely stock the patch.  To avoid disappointing Scouts, CHECK FIRST to see if any are available in your area before promoting this program and patch.

        Of course, promoting Crime Prevention is still a valid project for Scouts, and can be done, even without the opportunity to get this award.

        The award can be earned at EACH Level, using different requirements.   The Award for completion of the requirements is the patch shown at the top of this page, and a wallet card, shown at the bottom of this page. In addition, a wall certificate is available for individuals, families, dens, packs, patrols, teams, crews, posts, or other groups who participate in the program.  The pin shown at the bottom of this page can be presented to youth and adults who participate in and/or give leadership to the program.

        The patch is worn on the uniform shirt, centered on the right pocket as a TEMPORARY patch. Only ONE Temporary patch may be worn at a time. The pin is NOT worn on the uniform.

        Phase I is basically an individual, or Youth and Family phase, and Phase II is designed to be a group, or Youth and Unit phase.

        Follow this link for guidelines for this award- http://usscouts.org/advance/CrimePrevGuide1.asp

        Boy Scout And Varsity Scouts Requirements

        Phase I

        Carry out the activities identified in this Phase I section.

        Individual

        • "Taking Care of Yourself When You Are Alone",
          Boy Scout Handbook, page 375
        • "Caring for Younger Children",
          Boy Scout Handbook, page 374

        Family

        • "The Family Council",
          Boy Scout Handbook, pages 371-373.
        • Discuss items on relationships of
          • drugs and crime
          • gangs and crime
          • graffiti and crime
          • peers and crime.

        Neighborhood / Community:

        • "Know Your Community",
          Boy Scout Handbook, page 341.
        • Visit a government agency responsible for crime prevention programs.

        Phase II

        Participate with your family, patrol, crew, team, troop, or friends in a crime prevention project, either an original project or a project of a neighborhood- or community-based organization. (Before beginning the project, have the unit leader approve your choice.)


        National Camping Award


         

                  

        The National Camping Award is both an annual and a cumulative award for units which receive a ribbon for the troop flag. Individuals, scouts, and scouters can also qualify for a cumulative patch by participating in campouts with their families, or patrols as well as unit campouts. Any combination of unit and individual campouts can be used to qualify for the individual cumulative award.

         

        The patch is an individual award for which all members of a unit may not qualify. Only those members who have met the cumulative camp out levels may qualify for one of the four awards. Each individual member needs to keep track of his personal campouts and have them approved by the scoutmaster. The patch can be placed on a backpack or worn as a temporary badge on the uniform.

         
         

        To earn the annual National Camping Award, a unit must have reached one of these levels of camping achievement:

        • 10 days and nights of camping
        • 20 days and nights of camping
        • 30 days and nights of camping
         

        To earn the cumulative National Camping Award, a unit must fulfill one of the following levels of camping during the entire history of the unit:

        • 100 days and night of camping
        • 250 days and night of camping
        • 500 days and night of camping
        • 1000 days and night of camping

        (The ribbon can also be displayed with the troop flag.)

         

        Individual scouts and scouters can also qualify for a National Camping Award patch provided that the required cumulative number of days and nights of camping has been met. This total can include any combination of camping with the scouts family, patrol or unit.

        • 100 days and nights of camping
        • 250 days and nights of camping
        • 500 days and nights of camping1000 days and nights of camping
           Award Application

           Individual Award Application

        Good Turn for America


        Good Turn for AmericaSince the BSA's inception in 1910, members have learned to live the principles of the Scout Oath and Law through community services and "helping other people at all times." With that history in mind, the BSA has developed a service initiative - Good Turn for America.

            What began with a singular act of service on a foggy London night quickly evolved into daily Good Turns and then into more encompassing national initiatives. These have included selling war bonds, collecting rubber and scrap metal, growing victory gardens during World War II, and more recently, Scouting for Food.
           We now have the opportunity to raise our levels of community service and increase awareness of the Scouting program within our neighborhoods. Nationally, the Boy Scouts of America has partnered with The Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity, the American Red Cross, the American Cancer Society, America's Second Harvest, and the Department of Homeland Security to increase our efforts in meeting the challenges of the 21st century.
           Good Turn for America will build on our members' and participants' current service efforts and will also include important partnerships with other community service organizations. These partnerships will provide many additional avenues for all of our members and participants to provide community service in their neighborhoods.

        Click here to log in your unit's service hours and be a part of the nation-wide Good Turn for America.

        BSA Physical Fitness Award


                                      
        The Physical Fitness Award can be earned at all levels of Scouting.
        Requirements
        1. Complete a cardiovascular fitness evaluation/consultation with your personal health care provider. (This can be done as part of the examination required by any council-approved class 3 medical evaluation.) (Now Part B of the Annual Health and Medical Form)
        2. Using the BSA references listed after the seven major components, give a presentation to a BSA or other community youth group (at least eight youth participants) on cardiovascular fitness, diet, the health benefits of regular aerobic exercise, exercise recommendation for the Scout-age group, and healthy lifestyles.
        3. Review the BSA guidelines for the Athletics and other physical activity or personal fitness-oriented merit badge and explain steps you have taken to follow each of the guidelines for the fitness goals. Explain precautions to be taken for a physical fitness activity in each of the following: woods, fields, facilities, and waterfront.
        4. Explain to your mentor the symptoms of dehydration and hypothermia. Explain the special considerations for preventing dehydration and hypothermia.
        5. Properly outfit for physical activities with proper equipment, clothing, and footwear. Know your own capabilities and limitations. Illustrate how you would prepare for the physical fitness goals included in the award program.
        6. With supervision from your mentor or other qualified persons, set up a fitness goal-oriented plan using the seven major components of fitness.
        7. Demonstrate your ability to improve your strength, posture, endurance, agility, speed, accuracy, and balance with your own goal-oriented fitness plan.

        Den Chief Service Award


                  

         The Den Chief Service Award is awarded to a Boy Scout who has served as a Den Chief and completed the requirements listed below. Den Chiefs who earn the award may wear the Service Award in addition to the standard den chief cord of their office, and may continue to wear it for as long as they are a youth Scout.

        (Before you begin work on this service award, discuss with your Den Leader and either your Scoutmaster, Varsity Coach, Venturing Adviser, or Cubmaster the role and importance of the Den Chief.)

         

         

        1. Serve the pack faithfully for 1 full year.
        2. Attend a den chief training (if available within year of service) OR be trained by the assistant Cubmaster and den leader.
        3. Know the purposes of Cub Scouting.
        4. Help Cub Scouts achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting.
        5. Be the activities assistant in den meetings. (lead five songs, five stunts or skits, five games, five sports activities)
        6. Set a good example by attitude and uniforming. (for a minimum of six months)
        7. Be a friend to the boys in the den.
        8. Take part in weekly meetings. (for a minimum of six months)
        9. Assist the den at the monthly pack program. (at least three times)
        10. Meet as needed with the adult members of the den, pack or troop.
        11. Complete FOUR of these projects:
        a. Serve as a staff member of a Cub Scout special event, such as a Scouting show, bicycle rodeo, etc.
        b. Serve as a staff member of a Cub Scout Day camp or resident camp.
        c. Advance one Boy Scout rank.
        d. Assist in recruiting three new Cub Scouts.
        e. Assist three Webelos Scouts to join a troop.
        f. Help to plan and carry out a joint pack-troop activity.
        g. Recommend to your Scoutmaster another Boy Scout to be a den chief.
        h. Assist three Cub Scouts to become Webelos Scouts.
        See Den Chief Handbook, No. 33211B for detailed requirements.
        The requirement information in (italics) above is from the detailed requirements in the Den Chief Handbook, No. 33211B.
         The Braids shown at the Top of this page ( Red White & Blue) are the Den Chief Service Award Braids. 

        Pictured below are the Braids worn by Scouts while serving as a Den Chief  (Blue & Gold) or as a Webelos Den Chief (Red, Blue & Gold)

        Each of these are worn over the left shoulder, (under the epaulet and under the arm). A Scout that has earned the Den Chief Service Award, and is serving as a Den Chief or Webelos Den Chief, may wear both braids.

        Den Chief Webelos Den Chief
        Den Chief Webelos
        Den Chief
            

          
          

        Founder’s Bar


           
           

                

         
         

        The Founder’s Bar is worn by all youth and adults whose names are on a new-unit charter or who officially join the new unit before the unit recharters for the first time. Members of veteran units still in operation who were on the original charter may also wear the Founder’s Bar with that unit’s numerals.

        This recognition will emphasize the importance and pride of forming and nurturing a new Scouting unit. While it does not guarantee the unit will become a Quality Unit, it does encourage multiple-year rechartering so members may continue to wear the bar.

        Once the unit has completed its charter, members may begin wearing the Founder’s Bar. The Founder’s Bar is worn on the left shoulder below the unit numerals.

        The Founder’s Bar, certificate, and pocket certificate are available for distribution. Contact your local Scout shop for more information.

        Religious Emblems- A Scout is Reverent


                                                                                                                                  

         

        Many religious-faith groups have programs of intensive religious education for individual Tiger Cubs, Wolf, Bear, Webelos, Boy Scouts, and Venturers. Religious Emblems are designed to recognize youth and adults who demonstrate faith, observe the creeds or principles of the faith, and give service. Religious emblems are not Scouting awards; they are presented by religious groups to boys who earn them.

        The Religious Emblems programs are administered by various religious institutions and recognized, but not sponsored, by the BSA. These are generally recognized by a medal and an embroidered square knot. In some denominations, four different awards may be available.

        Some programs allow Girl Scouts or youth not in Scouting to participate in these same programs and be presented with the same medals but only a member of the Boy Scouts America can wear the BSA knots.

        The medals are usually only worn on special occasions, pinned immediately above the top of the left pocket flap of the uniform shirt.

        Youth may earn an emblem whether or not they are members of a unit operated by a religious organization. The intent of the program is to work directly with your own religious leader or, in some cases, a layperson (mentor) designated by that religious leader. 

                                                           See Religious Emblems from PRAY Publishing

        Interpreter Strip


        Requirements:
        Boys and adults may wear this strip if they show their knowledge of a foreign language or the sign language for the hearing impaired by:

        1. Carrying on a five-minute conversation in this language.
        2. Translating a two-minute speech or address.
        3. Writing a letter in the language.*
        4. Translating 200 words from the written word.

                      *Does not apply for sign language.
         ------------------------

        The Interpreter Strip is not an award, per se -- it's SOLE purpose is to give others an immediate, visual cue that you are able to perform as an interpreter, when needed. That's why the patch is unique in it's appearance; that's why it's placed near your name tag on your uniform; and, that's why it's displayed in the other language. E.g., Deutsch, instead of German.

        While the BSA Supply Division currently only carries Interpreter Strips for American Sign Language (ASL), Arabic, Cantonese, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin (Simplified), Mandarin (Traditional), Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese, that does not, in any way, mean that these are the only ones authorized for earning the Interpreter Strip.

        You can wear an Interpreter Strip for any language (other than English), as well as American Sign Language, Signing (which is not the same as American Sign Language), and even Morse Code. And no, spoof patches are NEVER authorized.

        If you cannot find an Interpreter Strip for the language you know, you can check other sources (i.e., eBay search for "interpreter strip" -spoof), or even have your own patch made... just as long as it conforms to the same standards as BSA-provided Interpreter Strips. It is imperative that you make sure the text of your Interpreter Strip is written in the subject language... not English! (Except, of course: ASL, Morse Code, Signing.)

        International Activity Badge


         

        The International Activity badge (#00144) is a 3-inch diameter patch which is worn as a TEMPORARY EMBLEM on the right pocket of the Scout or Scouter to recognize participation in unit, council, and world scouting international activities. It is NOT worn in place of or alongside the World Crest emblem. There is also a 5-inch jacket patch (#00145) available for authorized wear.

        Each local Council has the authority to determine requirements for the patch. There is no time restriction for earning the International activity patch.

        Ready and Prepared Award


                Ready & Prepared ribbons

           Ready & Prepared patch

        Ready and Prepared Award


        The BSA Ready & Prepared Award was developed to encourage and reward Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews that incorporate safe practices while enjoying challenging activities. The award acknowledges the common sense and judgment, founded on knowledge and training, used to incorporate risk management into a unit's decision-making process. It recognizes that the more responsibility individual members take for their personal health and safety, the more everyone contributes to a successful activity. Earning the award helps units focus on areas in which emphasizing risk management can help reduce fatalities and serious injury, such as

        • Driver and passenger safety
        • BSA Youth Protection
        • Precautions for aquatics activities
        • Premises safety and first-aid readiness
        • Personal fitness and safety

        The Award

        There are two award levels: Gold and Silver.

        To earn the Gold Award, a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew must complete 10 mandatory requirements and three elective requirements. Youth and adult members of a unit earning the Gold Award are entitled to wear the gold-bordered BSA Ready & Prepared Award patch and the unit is entitled to display the gold BSA Ready & Prepared ribbon.

        To earn the Silver Award, a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew must complete 10 mandatory requirements and six elective requirements. Youth and adult members of a unit earning the Silver Award are entitled to wear the silver-bordered BSA Ready & Prepared Award patch, and the unit is entitled to display the silver BSA Ready & Prepared Award ribbon. Units earning the Silver Award also will be acknowledged in Boys' Life magazine. Apply for this award at the time of rechartering.

        Award Requirements

        All instruction for and participation in activities for the BSA Ready & Prepared Award must follow all precautions and safety measures laid out in the Guide to Safe Scouting and other Scouting literature.

        When a Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew has fulfilled the requirements, it should submit a completed award application to the local council.

        A unit can earn the Gold Award this year, work on the remaining three elective requirements, and earn the Silver Award next year.

        Mandatory Requirements

        Training

        1. At least three registered adults in the unit are trained in Safety Afloat and Safe Swim Defense.
        2. Two or more registered members, including at least one adult, are trained in first aid and CPR by a recognized agency such as the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

        Youth Protection

        1. Every registered adult in the unit was trained in BSA Youth Protection within the past three years.
        2. Within the past 12 months the unit has viewed the appropriate Youth Protection video.
          • "A Time to Tell" (ages 11 to 14)
          • "Personal Safety Awareness" (ages 14 to 20)
        3. All registered adults and all adults listed as drivers on tour permits for activities occurring during the past six months have read and signed the Driver's Pledge.
        4. The Scoutmaster, Coach, or Advisor; assistant Scoutmasters, Coaches, or Advisors; and unit committee chair have in their possession and have read the most current Guide to Safe Scouting.

        Premises Safety

        1. Unit members have conducted a safety check of their meeting place using the checklist in the Guide to Safe Scouting.
        2. The unit first-aid kit was updated in the past six months and is complete.

        Permits

        1. During the past 12 months the unit filed all required tour permits with the local council. A national tour permit is required for all activities in which travel is 500 or more miles one-way. Local councils set requirements for travel fewer than 500 miles one-way.

        Driving/Traffic Safety

        Troops and Teams Only

        1. At least half of the Scouts registered in the unit have earned the Traffic Safety merit badge.

        Venturing Crews Only

        1. All youth with a driving permit or driver's license have taken Venturing Out: Keys to Safe Driving online or have attended a group presentation.

        Elective Award Requirements

        In addition to the mandatory requirements, units must complete three of these elective requirements to earn the Gold Award or six to earn the Silver Award.

        Youth Training

        Troops and Teams Only

        1. At least half of the registered Scouts have earned the First Aid merit badge.

        Venturing Crews Only

        1. At least half of the registered crew members are trained in CPR by a recognized agency such as the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association.
         Fitness
        1. At least 75 percent of unit members have completed requirements for the To Be Physically Fit BSA Award or the Quest Award. Details on these awards can be found on the BSA Web site.

        Permits

        1. The unit has filed a Unit Money Earning Application with the local council for all unit fund-raising activities occurring in the past 12 months.

        Special Achievements

        1. The unit has earned the Emergency Preparedness, BSA, Award. Details about this award are located on the BSA Web site.
        2. Unit members have conducted a safety promotion within their community. Areas of interest include Climb On Safely, winter sports, bicycle safety, shooting sports, using tools and equipment, wilderness camping, and using fuels.
        3. Each member of the unit has read chapter 6, Managing Risk, in the Fieldbook and has participated in a group discussion about what he or she read.
        4. The unit has a risk management or health and safety officer. This position can be youth or adult. Attach a copy of the responsibilities of this position to the award application.

        The application form may be downloaded from BSA's web site, at: http://old.scouting.org/awards/10-278/10-278.pdf


        Donor Awarness


         There are NO formal requirements for these patches.
        Each Unit establishes the procedure for awarding the strip. Usually, a Donor Awareness Patch is awarded to a Cub Scout or Boy Scout the first time he is successful in getting an adult family member, friend, relative, or other acquaintance to agree to become an organ donor, and to fill out and carry an Organ Donor Card.

          
        For a number of years, BSA has offered the Donor Awareness Patch to Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. It is worn on the right pocket of the uniform as a temporary emblem. 
           BSA has reduced their emphasis on this program, but has not discontinued it completely. The patch is still being produced, but some Scout Shops™ may not routinely stock the patch. To avoid disappointing Scouts, CHECK FIRST to see if any are available in your area before promoting this program and patch. Of course, promoting Donor Awareness is still a valid project for Scouts, and can be done, even without the opportunity to get this patch.
        (Check to be sure this is still available in your local Council.)

        William T. Hornaday Awards


        The William T. Hornaday Awards are presented for distinguished service in natural resource conversation for units, Scouts, Venturers, and Scouters. Venturers may earn the Hornaday badge or the Hornaday Bronze or Silver Medal. Venturing crews or Sea Scout ships may earn the William T. Hornaday Unit Award.

        These awards are unusual prizes with demanding expectations. Award judging is performed by the national Hornaday Awards Committee who follow Dr. Hornaday's injunction:

        "Unusual prizes are to be won only by unusual services." <>

        Boy Scouts and Varsity Scouts may earn an individual youth member award or a troop/team unit award. All award recipients must meet age, elective work, project and documentation requirements.

        Individual youth member awards

        Eligibility: Any Boy Scout or Varsity Scout completing requirements before his 18th birthday is eligible to earn the William T. Hornaday Award for Boy Scouts.

        William T. Hornaday Silver medal

        The William T. Hornaday Silver medal is the BSA's highest individual youth member conservation award.

        1. Earn First Class rank.
        2. Earn the Environmental Science merit badge.
        3. Earn all of the following merit badges:
        • Energy
        • Fish and Wildlife Management
        • Forestry
        • Public Health
        • Soil and Water Conservation
        4. Earn any three of the following merit badges:
        • Bird Study
        • Fishing
        • Gardening
        • Geology
        • Insect Study
        • Landscape Architecture
        • Mammal Study
        • Nature
        • Nuclear Science
        • Oceanography
        • Plant Science
        • Pulp and Paper
        • Reptile and Amphibian Study
        • Weather
        5. Plan, lead, and carry out four projects from four separate categories listed below
        • Energy conservation
        • Soil and water conservation
        • Fish and wildlife management
        • Forestry and range management
        • Air and water pollution control
        • Resource recovery (recycling)
        • Hazardous material disposal and management
        • Invasive species control
        6. Submit required documentation:
        a. Expectations
        1. Describe the origination of the idea.
        2. State the project's purpose and identify the conservation issue it addresses.
        3. Conduct research, investigation, and study.
        4. Develop project plans.
        5. Implement and manage the projects.
        6. Demonstrate leadership and involve others.
        7. Describe how the project influenced the attitudes of others.
        8. Record the time and resources devoted to each project.
        9. Explain the relationships among projects, if projects are interrelated. Each project, however, must be from a different category of conservation, as described earlier.

        William T. Hornaday Bronze medal

        1. Earn First Class rank.
        2. Earn the Environmental Science merit badge.
        3. Earn three of the following merit badges:
        • Energy
        • Fish and Wildlife Management
        • Forestry
        • Public Health
        • Soil and Water Conservation
        4. Earn any two additional merit badges from the following list:
        • Bird Study
        • Energy
        • Fish and Wildlife Management
        • Fishing
        • Forestry
        • Gardening
        • Geology
        • Insect Study
        • Landscape Architecture
        • Mammal Study
        • Nature
        • Nuclear Science
        • Oceanography
        • Plant Science
        • Public Health
        • Pulp and Paper
        • Reptile and Amphibian Study
        • Soil and Water Conservation
        • Weather
        5. Plan, lead, and carry out three projects from three separate categories listed below
        • Energy conservation
        • Soil and water conservation
        • Fish and wildlife management
        • Forestry and range management
        • Air and water pollution control
        • Resource recovery (recycling)
        • Hazardous material disposal and management
        • Invasive species control
        6. Submit required documentation:
        a. Expectations
        1. Describe the origination of the idea.
        2. State the project's purpose and identify the conservation issue it addresses.
        3. Conduct research, investigation, and study.
        4. Develop project plans.
        5. Implement and manage the projects.
        6. Demonstrate leadership and involve others.
        7. Describe how the project influenced the attitudes of others.
        8. Record the time and resources devoted to each project.
        9. Explain the relationships among projects, if projects are interrelated. Each project, however, must be from a different category of conservation, as described earlier.

        William T. Hornaday badge

        1. Earn First Class rank.
        2. Earn three of the following merit badges:
        • Energy
        • Fish and Wildlife Management
        • Forestry
        • Public Health
        • Soil and Water Conservation
        3. Earn any two additional merit badges from the following list:
        • Bird Study
        • Energy
        • Fish and Wildlife Management
        • Fishing
        • Forestry
        • Gardening
        • Geology
        • Insect Study
        • Landscape Architecture
        • Mammal Study
        • Nature
        • Nuclear Science
        • Oceanography
        • Plant Science
        • Public Health
        • Pulp and Paper
        • Reptile and Amphibian Study
        • Soil and Water Conservation
        • Weather
        4. Plan, lead, and carry out at least one project from one of the categories listed below:
        • Energy conservation
        • Soil and water conservation
        • Fish and wildlife management
        • Forestry and range management
        • Air and water pollution control
        • Resource recovery (recycling)
        • Hazardous material disposal and management
        • Invasive species control

        Detailed information about the William T. Hornaday Awards, including application forms, are available online here or here. Just the application form can be downloaded here.

        World Conservation Award


         

                                                     
        You can earn this award as a Boy Scout by earning the following merit badges:

        • Environmental Science merit badge.
        • Either Soil and Water Conservation OR Fish and Wildlife Management merit badge.
        • Citizenship in the World merit badge.

        The World Conservation Award is worn on the uniform shirt, centered on the right pocket as a temporary patch. It can also be worn on the back of a merit badge sash. It does not replace the World Crest on the uniform.

        Unlike the Cub Scout version of the patch, no conservation effort is outlined in the requirements for the Boy Scout version. The reason the volunteer aspect has been dropped in the jump from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts is unclear, as community service oriented projects of maintenance and restoration are common to many requirements for Special Opportunity awards, as well as to Scouting in general. This alteration of approach may be in light of the fact that specific badge requirements encourage the Scout to conduct or participate in a project of their own while working on the badge, and they may very well have already been involved in some type of project while working on the badge. These service-based requirements however, are purely optional, as there are multiple alternatives. It is unclear whether this is in fact a loop hole, or intended by the awards' founders. See Fish and Wildlife Management requirement 5c and Soil and Water Conservation requirement 7f.

         

        Attachments
        Icon File Name Comment  
        worldconservation_boy.pdf Application for Boy Scout World Conservation Award  

        Conservation Good Turn Award


                

         The Conservation Good Turn Award is an opportunity for Scout units to join with conservation or environmental organizations (federal, state, local, or private) to carry out a conservation Good Turn in their home communities. Working together in the local community, the unit and the agency plan the details and establish the date, time and location for carrying out the project.

        Conservation projects should involve the entire unit - scouts, leaders, and family members. Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts participating in the Conservation Good Turn can also meet some advancement requirements.

        Agencies to contact for project ideas:

        • Natural Resource and Conservations Service (NRCS)
        • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
        • U.S. Forest Service
        • Bureau of Land Management
        • National Park Service
        • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
        • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
        • local City Works department
        • Audubon Society
        • Trout Unlimited

        Some suggested projects could be:

        • Plant grasses, trees, shrubs, and ground cover to stop soil erosion.
        • As a den or pack, adopt a park and keep it clean.
        • Organize or participate in a recycling program.
        • Participate in a beach or waterfront cleanup. Record the items collected and determine the possible harmful effects to wildlife.
        • Establish a nature trail, plant vegetation, or carry out other needed projects as requested by the camp ranger at a local BSA camp property.

         

         

        Historic Trails Award


                           


        "The Historic Trails Award is an award that may be earned by members of a
        Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, or Venturing crew for hiking a trail listed in Nationally Approved Historic Trails and completing a project related to the trail."

        Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, Venturers, and leaders are eligible to earn this award.

        It is presented as a cloth (No. 00187) or leather (No. 00243) Boy Scout and Scouter, equipment decoration. . The award is not worn on the uniform. It may be worn on a jacket or patch vest or placed on blankets, backpacks, or other personal equipment.

         

        A unit historic activity requires members to:

        1. Locate a historic trail or site and study information relating to it. (The information may be obtained from an adult historic society, public library, or people living near the trail or the site.)
        2. Hike or camp 2 days and 1 night along the trail or in the vicinity of the site.
        3. Cooperate with an adult group such as a historic society to restore and mark all or part of this trail or site. (This may be done during the hike or overnight camp.) Or cooperate with such a group to plan and stage a historic pageant, ceremony, or other public event related to this trail or site -- such event should be large enough to merit coverage by the local press.
        4. Your unit leader must then file the Historic Trails Award application with your council service center.

        Attachments
        Icon File Name Comment  
        Historic Trails Appl 34408.pdf Historic Trails Application PDF  

        50 Miler Award


                                                               
                     


        "The 50-Miler Award is presented to each qualifying individual for satisfactory participation in an approved trip. In order to qualify for the award the group of which the individual is a member must fulfill all of the following requirements."

        Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, Venturers, and leaders are eligible to earn this award.

        It is presented as a cloth (No. 00188) or leather (No. 00244) Boy Scout and Scouter, equipment decoration. . The award is not worn on the uniform. It may be worn on a jacket or patch vest or placed on blankets, backpacks, or other personal equipment.

        In order to qualify for the award the group of which the individual is a member must fulfill all of the following requirements.

        1. Make complete and satisfactory plans for the trip, including the possibilities of advancement.
        2. Cover the trail or canoe or boat route of not less than 50 consecutive miles; take a minimum of 5 consecutive days to complete the trip without the aid of motors. (In some areas pack animals may be used.)
        3. During the time on the trail or waterway, complete a minimum of 10 hours each of group work on projects to improve the trail, springs, campsite, portage or area. If after checking with recognized authorities, it is not possible to complete 10 hours each of group work on the trail, a similar project may be done in the unit's home area ( There should be no unauthorized cutting of brush or timber.)
        4. Unit or tour leader must then file a 50-Miler Award application with the local council service center. The application gives additional details about planning the trip.

        Provisional participant eligibility on a trek or cruise 
         Provisional groups and individuals are participants that do not belong to the same charted unit.

        The 50 Miler Award is presented to individuals completing the requirements of a trip:

        • Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, or Venturer units, including provisional individuals.
        • Provisional groups (participants not from a single unit); however, chartered unit participation is most desirable.
        • Sea Scouts are only eligible when participating as part of their own chartered ship. Sea Scouts participating as members of a provisional ship are not eligible for this award.




        Hometown USA


        Hometown USA Emblem

          
        Requirements:
         

        1. Merit badges. Earn three merit badges from the following list of twelve: Citizenship in the Community, Communications, Environmental Science, Fish and Wildlife Management, Forestry, Gardening, Geology, Landscape Architecture, Nature, Plant Science, Public Speaking, Soil and Water Conservation.
        2. Community service project. In addition to earning the merit badges, a Boy Scout is required to perform a community service project. The project should involve a minimum of eight hours of time, two of which must involve management planning, with the other six consisting of carrying out the project. It should help keep America beautiful and benefit the community either physically or financially. One way to do this is to plan the community service project as part of Keep America Beautiful Week or Public Lands Day.

        List of Ideas for Community Service Projects

        1. Develop and help maintain a community garden.
        2. Build a nature trail for use as an outdoor classroom or for community enjoyment.
        3. Develop a recycling project that involves your whole troop (i.e., newspaper and/or bottle collection).
        4. Conduct a survey of local storefronts. Determine areas where litter has accumulated. Work with storeowners to help improve conditions.
        5. Plan and make a presentation to elementary students about the importance of conserving natural resources. Take students on a nature walk, pointing out natural resources.
        6. Conduct soil and water conservation activities on a heavily used trail to prevent erosion. Record your activities.
        7. Construct water facilities and plant vegetation that will provide food and shelter for wildlife in appropriate places.
        8. Adopt a park, block, vacant lot, etc. Erect signs urging others not to litter or vandalize. Protect a flower bed or plant species with fencing. Remove litter and debris. Build picnic tables or fix up old ones, paint benches, etc.
        9. Research which plant species are native to your area, and plant and maintain a community wildflower garden. Include descriptive and educational signs for the public.
        10. Organize an anti-litter poster competition among junior and senior high schoolers. Arrange for businesses to donate awards for the winners and recruit community judges. Include media coverage. Get local businesses and schools to display the posters.
        11. Become involved in a local environmental/recycling issue. Attend public meetings, talk to public officials, and make a report to your troop about what you have learned. Decide how you want to become involved in resolving the issue and spend your project time educating your fellow citizens as to your viewpoint and assisting your "side" in its campaign.
        12. Establish and maintain a bird sanctuary.
        13. Find out which birds, animals, and fish are native to your area. Write an article on the importance of maintaining proper balance between man and nature. Take steps to maintain habitat areas for this wildlife.

         Keep America Beautiful Week

        Keep America Beautiful Week developed from eleven consecutive years' observances of KAB Day. It originated in 1971 as "Scouting Keep America Beautiful Day." KAB Day was eventually extended to a weeklong observance (usually the fourth week of April). Millions of citizens across the nation participate each year.

        Public Lands Day

        Public Lands Day involves citizen volunteers in cleaning and maintaining nearby public lands. This event falls annually on the Saturday following Labor Day. The purpose of Public Lands Day is to instill a sense of pride and ownership among citizens through hands-on participation in continuing education and improvement projects on public properties.

        BSA Lifeguard Award




        "BSA Lifeguard is a three-year training designation awarded to Boy Scouts, Venturers, and adults who meet prescribed requirements in aquatics skills, Safe Swim Defense, Safety Afloat, first aid, and emergency action."

         

        Prerequisites

        A. Before doing requirements 6 through 25, complete the following:
        1. Submit proof of age. You must be at least 15 years old to participate.
        2. Submit written evidence of fitness for swimming activities(signed health history).
        3. Swim continuously for 550 yards, including at least 100 yards each of the following strokes in good form: front crawl, breaststroke, elementary backstroke, and sidestroke.
        4. Immediately following the above swim, tread water for two minutes.
        5. Starting in the water, swim 20 yards using a front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive 7 to 10 feet, retrieve a 10-pound object, surface, swim with the object 20 yards back to the starting point, and exit the water, all within 1 minute, 40 seconds.

        Requirements

        B. Complete the following requirements within a 120-day period:
        6. Demonstrate reaching assists from the deck using an arm, a rescue tube, and a pole.
        7. Demonstrate throwing assists using a throw bag and a ring buoy with line attached. Throw each device such that the line lands within reach of a conscious subject 30 feet from shore.
        8. Demonstrate:

        a. Rescue of a conscious subject in deep water using a rescue board, kayak, rowboat, canoe, or other rescue craft that would be available at your local facility.
        b. Repeat for an unconscious subject.

        9. Demonstrate an entry and front approach with a rescue tube to a conscious subject in deep water 30 feet away from shore. Extend the rescue tube within the grasp of the subject and then tow the subject back to the entry point, providing direction and reassurance throughout.
        10. Demonstrate an entry and rear approach with a rescue tube to a conscious subject in deep water 30 feet away from shore. Grasp the victim from behind using a scoop technique under the arms to support the subject against a rescue tube squeezed between the victim's back and the rescuer's chest. Reassure the subject and tow the subject to shore.
        11. Demonstrate use of a rescue tube to assist two subjects grasping each other.
        12. Demonstrate both front and rear head-hold escapes from a subject's grasp.
        13. Demonstrate a feet-first entry in deep water with a rescue tube and swim an approach stroke 25 yards within 25 seconds while trailing the tube.
        14. Demonstrate an entry and front approach with a rescue tube to a face-down unconscious subject at or near the surface in deep water. Use a wrist tow to place the subject face-up on the rescue tube and use a one-arm tow to the closest point of safety.
        15. Demonstrate an entry and rear approach with a rescue tube to a face-down unconscious subject at or near the surface in deep water. Use a scoop technique to position the rescue tube between the subject and the rescuer's chest, then either lean back or rotate to bring the subject face-up. Tow the subject to the nearest point of safety using either a two-arm tow or switching to a one-arm tow.
        16. Demonstrate an entry and approach with a rescue tube to an unconscious subject submerged face-down at or near the bottom in 6 to 8 feet of water. Bring the subject to the surface and tow to the nearest point of safety.
        17. Remove a subject from the water using each of the following techniques in the appropriate circumstances with the aid of a second rescuer:

        a. Vertical lift at the edge of a pool or pier using a backboard
        b. Walking assist
        c. Beach drag

        18. Participate in multiple-rescuer search techniques appropriate for a missing subject in murky water:

        a. Line search in shallow water
        b. Underwater line search in deep water without equipment
        c. Underwater line search in deep water with mask and fins

        19. Demonstrate head-splint (extended arm rollover) in-line stabilization for a face-down subject with suspected spinal injury in very shallow water (18 inches or less).
        20. Demonstrate head-splint in-line stabilization for a suspected spinal injury in shallow water (waist to chest deep):

        a. For a face-up subject
        b. For a face-down subject

        21. Demonstrate head and chin support in-line stabilization for a suspected spinal injury in shallow water (waist to chest deep):

        a. For a face-up subject
        b. For a face-down subject

        22. Demonstrate in-line stabilization for a suspected spinal injury in deep water, swim the subject to shallow water, confirm vital signs, and, with the assistance of three others, remove the subject from the water using a backboard with straps and a head immobilization device.
        23. Correctly answer 80 percent of the questions on the BSA Lifeguard written test covering Safe Swim Defense, aquatics procedures at BSA camps, guard duties, emergency action plans, surveillance, and water rescue. Review any incomplete or incorrect answers.
        24. Show evidence of current training in American Red Cross First Aid (valid for three years) and American Red Cross CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer (valid for one year) or equivalent (includes any training for a camp health officer recognized by BSA national camp standards).
        25. Serve as a lifeguard, under supervision, for at least two separate BSA swimming activities for a combined time of two hours. Afterward, discuss the experience with the lifeguarding instructor.

        Completion Options

        Course completion cards are valid only when signed by either a current BSA Aquatics Instructor or BSA Lifeguard Instructor approved by the local council. Training is valid for three years provided First Aid and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer training are kept current during that period. There are four ways to obtain a course completion card:

        1. Course Completion — Complete all requirements in the instructor manual during a scheduled course of instruction. The participant must attend all course sessions. Makeup sessions are allowed at the instructor’s discretion. If an individual is unable to complete all requirements during the scheduled course, the instructor may elect to continue training until the participant is able to complete all the requirements provided the total elapsed time from start to finish does not exceed the 120-day period.
        2. Renewal Challenge — Anyone with a BSA Lifeguard completion card that is current or has expired within six months may renew or extend the training by performing requirements 2 through 24 without attending the standard course sessions. Prior to the testing, the instructor may provide a renewal training session to review and update skills and information. Summer camp aquatics directors should renew training for aquatics staff members during precamp training while emphasizing local camp facilities, procedures, and emergency action plans.
        3. Crossover Challenge — Anyone who holds current training in American Red Cross Lifeguarding, American Red Cross Waterfront Lifeguarding, or other lifeguard training programs may obtain a BSA Lifeguard completion card by performing requirements 1 through 25 without attending the standard course sessions. The lifeguard training program that issued the training certificate must be recognized by the local or state regulatory agency that sets standards for lifeguards at youth camps. The instructor may provide a crossover training session to review and update skills and information prior to the testing. The applicant may receive credit for requirement 25 if within the past 18 months he or she has served as a lifeguard, under supervision, or has supervised lifeguards, for at least two separate BSA swimming activities for a combined time of two hours. Otherwise, due to BSA procedures not implemented at other lifeguarding venues, the applicant must accomplish requirement 25.
        4. Coinstructors — (BSA Aquatics Instructor or BSA Lifeguard Instructor) may each sign a completion card for the other at the conclusion of a BSA Lifeguard course if they satisfy requirements 2–22 and 24.

        See the Application For BSA Lifeguard, BSA No. 34435, for detailed requirements.

        Mile Swim BSA Award


                 
          The Mile Swim BSA Award is offered by many Boy Scout Summer Camps as a part of their aquatics program.
        The patch is not worn on the
        uniform. It is an aquatic insignia and can be worn on swim trunks. It can also be worn on a jacket or patch vest or placed on blankets, backpacks, or other personal equipment.

        Mile Swim BSA is not a merit badge.

        Requirements:

         

        1. Explain how regular exercise contributes to good health and why swimming is one of the best forms of exercise.
        2. Tell what precautions and procedures a swimmer and escort must follow for distance swimming over open water.
        3. Under the supervision of a currently qualified certified aquatics instructor, BSA or equivalent, participate in four hours of training and preparation for distance swimming (one hour a day maximum).
        4. Swim 1 mile over a measured course that has been approved by the trained instructor who will supervise the swim.

         

        Boardsailing BSA Award


         

        The Boardsailing BSAprogram has been developed to introduce Scout-age children to basic boardsailing skills, equipment, and safety precautions, to encourage development of skills that promote fitness and safe aquatics recreation, and to lay a skill and knowledge foundation for those who will later participate in more advanced and demanding activities on the water.

        Boardsailing BSA is not a merit badge.

        Requirements:
        1. Review the BSA guidelines for boardsailing and explain steps you have taken to follow each of the ten guidelines found in Section V of Camp Program and Property Management, No. 20-920.
        2. Explain precautions to be taken for boardsailing on each of the following.
          a. Lakes
          b. Rivers
          c. Ocean or bay areas
        3. What is hypothermia? Describe to your counselor the symptoms of hypothermia. What special considerations in preventing hypothermia are necessary for boardsailing?
        4. Properly rig and prepare the sailboard you are using. Point out and explain the function of each of the following: uphaul, outhaul, downhaul, cleat, leach, tack, clew, foot, skeg, centerboard, wishbone boom, universal, luff, and center of effort. Explain how to steer the sailboard.
        5. Demonstrate your ability to uphaul the sail, find the neutral position to the wind (sail luffing), and control the board's position with foot movement.
        6. With supervision from your instructor, sail a course that involves beating, reaching, and running. Change tack by coming about.

        Kayaking BSA Award




        Kayaking BSA provides an introduction to kayaking skills and safety procedures and serves as a program opportunity for Boy Scout, Varsity, and Venturing units in camp or out. Mastery of Kayaking BSA skills is a first critical step towards satisfying Safety Afloat guidelines for safe kayak excursions.

        Kayaking activities are limited to Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts, and Venturers. Additional kayaking information may be found in the Kayaking BSA pamphlet, No. 19-510, the Fieldbook, No. 33104; the Whitewater merit badge pamphlet, 33405; and Varsity Team Program Features, Volume III, No. 34839.

        Kayaking BSA is not a merit badge.

        Requirements:

        1. Before fulfilling the following requirements, successfully complete the BSA Swimmer test.
        2. Do the following:
          a. Describe various types of kayaks and how they differ in design, materials, and purpose.
          b. Name the parts of the kayak you are using for this exercise.
          c. Demonstrate how to choose an appropriately sized kayak paddle and how to position your hands.
        3. Do the following:
          a. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
          b. Demonstrate how to select and properly fit a PFD.
          c. Explain the importance of safety equipment such as PFD's, air bags, grab loops, and helmets.
        4. Demonstrate your ability to aid yourself and others in the event of a capsize:
          a. Capsize your kayak in water at least seven feet deep, perform a wet exit if necessary, and swim the boat to shore.
          b. With assistance, if needed, ready the capsized craft for use.
          c. Show how to approach a capsized paddler in your kayak and tow him to shore.
          d. While upright in your kayak, right a capsized kayak, empty it of water, and assist the paddler aboard without returning to shore.
        5. As a solo paddler, demonstrate the following:
          a. Entering and launching a kayak from shore or dock.
          b. Landing or docking and exiting a kayak.
          c. Forward stroke
          d. Sweep stroke
          e. Reverse sweep
          f. Draw stroke
          g. Rudder stroke
          h. Back stroke
        6. As a solo paddler, do the following:
          a. Paddle forward in a reasonably straight line.
          b. Move the kayak sideways to the right and to the left.
          c. Pivot 360 degrees to the right and left.
          d. Stop the kayak.

        Scuba BSA Award


          

        Scuba BSA
        introduces qualified
        Boy Scout, Venturing, and registered adult participants to the special skills, equipment, and safety precautions associated with scuba diving, encourages aquatics activities that promote fitness and recreation, and provides a foundation for those who later will participate in more advanced underwater activity.

        The Scuba BSA experience contains two parts — Knowledge Development and Water Skills Development. During the first part, participants learn basic dive safety information and overview skills to be used during their water experience. The Water Skills Development session introduces essential dive skills, such as mask clearing, regulator clearing, and alternate air source use. The Scuba BSA program is conducted in clear, confined water by an instructor certified by diving organizations recognized by the BSA.

        Completion of Scuba BSA requirements sets the stage for additional training, but does not qualify the participant to dive independently, either in confined water or open water environments.

        Scuba BSA is not a merit badge.
        Scuba BSA is not a diver certification.

        Requirements:

         

        1. Before doing other requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test. To begin the test, jump feet first into water over the head in depth, level off, and begin swimming. Swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be completed in one swim without stops and must include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
        2. Discuss the importance of using the buddy system at all times while scuba diving. Explain that a dive buddy is there to assist with the donning and doffing of equipment, to lend assistance in case of emergency and to share in the underwater experience. Remember, always dive with a buddy — Never dive alone!
        3. Review hazards associated with scuba diving, including causes of decompression incidents, and safety procedures to avoid them. Explain the importance of never using scuba equipment unless you are enrolled in a training exercise, or have completed a diver certification program, taught by a certified instructor.
          By the end of a Water Skills Development session, the participants will be able to meet the following requirements in clear, confined water:
        4. State the purpose of the following pieces of basic diving equipment: mask, fins, BCD, BCD inflator, regulator, air gauge and alternate air source.
        5. Describe how to locate the air gauge, and explain how to recognize the “caution zone” on it.
        6. Don and adjust mask, fins, snorkel, BCD, scuba, and weights with the assistance of a buddy, instructor, or certified assistant.
        7. While underwater, demonstrate and recognize the following hand signals:
          • Okay?/Okay!;
          • Stop;
          • Up;
          • Down;
          • Out of air;
          • Come here;
          • Ear problem;
          • Slow down/Take it easy;
          • Something is wrong;
          • Watch me;
          • Check your air supply.
        8. Inflate/deflate a BCD at the surface using the low pressure inflator.
        9. In shallow water, demonstrate proper compressed air breathing habits; remembering to breathe naturally and not hold the breath.
        10. Clear the regulator while underwater using both exhalation and purge-button methods and resume normal breathing from it.
        11. In shallow water, recover a regulator hose from behind the shoulder while underwater.
        12. In shallow water, clear a partially flooded mask while underwater.
        13. Swim underwater with scuba equipment while maintaining control of both direction and depth, properly equalizing the ears and mask to accommodate depth changes.
        14. While underwater, locate and read submersible pressure gauge and signal whether the air supply is adequate or low based on the gauge’s caution zone.
        15. In shallow water, breathe underwater for at least 30 seconds from an alternate air source supplied by the instructor.
        16. Demonstrate the techniques for a proper ascent.
        NOTE: The counselor for Scuba BSA must hold an instructor rating and be in current teaching status with PADI, NAUI, SSI or other member of the RSTC in accordance with BSA scuba policies. Instruction must meet the minimum training standards for introductory scuba experiences set by the RSTC and guidelines provided in the Scuba BSA Brochure, No. 19-515. BSA scuba policies are provided in that brochure and also in the Guide to Safe Scouting

        Snorkeling BSA Award


         

        The Snorkeling BSA requirements introduce Scout-age children and adult leaders to the special skills, equipment, and safety precautions associated with snorkeling; encourage the development of aquatics skills that promote fitness and recreation; and provide a foundation for those who later will participate in more advanced underwater activity.

        Snorkeling BSA is not a merit badge.

        Requirements:

        1. Before doing other requirements, successfully complete the BSA swimmer test: Jump feetfirst into water over the head in depth, level off, and begin swimming. Swim 75 yards in a strong manner using one or more of the following strokes: sidestroke, breaststroke, trudgen, or crawl; then swim 25 yards using an easy, resting backstroke. The 100 yards must be completed in one swim without stops and include at least one sharp turn. After completing the swim, rest by floating.
        2. Discuss the importance of using the buddy system at all times while snorkeling and list duties of a buddy, beginning with equipment checks.
        3. Explain the function, fit, and selection of mask, fins, and snorkel. Discuss the use of inflatable flotation vests and PFD’s when snorkeling in open water.
        4. In confined, shallow water (about waist deep), demonstrate use of mask and snorkel:
          a. Show how to prevent the mask from fogging and how to equalize pressure in mask, ears, and sinus cavities. With your head underwater, flood the mask, observe the effect on your vision, surface, and drain the water from the mask.
          b. With your face in the water, breathe through the snorkel. Then submerge, surface, clear water from the snorkel, and resume free breathing without removing the snorkel from your mouth.
        5. In confined, shallow water, demonstrate the use of swim fins: Do first using only fins, and then repeat with a mask and snorkel.
          a. Fit and adjust fins to feet.
          b. Walk with fins as if entering from a beach.
          c. Swim at the surface (10 yards) and underwater (three yards) using the flutter kick.
          d. Control direction without using hands while swimming with fins at the surface and underwater.
        6. In confined, deep water (six to 12 feet), demonstrate:
          a. Proper techniques for entering and exiting the water with snorkeling equipment from a dock or boat.
          b. Headfirst and feetfirst surface dives, including proper body position for safe ascent and descent.
        7. Show knowledge of snorkeling signals:
          a. Demonstrate divers’ signs and signals, both audible and visual, for use at the surface and underwater.
          b. Set out a diver down flag and explain its function.
        8. In clear, confined water eight to 12 feet deep that has a firm bottom, while swimming with a buddy, use mask, fins, and snorkel to locate and recover an object from the bottom.
        9. Demonstrate basic survival skills:
          a. Float facedown for five minutes while breathing through a snorkel with a minimum of movement.
          b. Demonstrate survival floating for five minutes without use of a snorkel.
          c. Using fins, show how to tow an exhausted or unconscious buddy to safety.
        10. Review and explain the eight points of Safe Swim Defense and BSA Snorkeling Safety. Explain training, preparations, and precautions required for snorkeling in open water. Explain environmental factors that affect snorkeling and discuss special precautions needed for oceans, streams, and lakes.
        11. Explain pressure, buoyancy, and submerged optics and acoustics related to snorkel swimming and diving.
        12. Discuss the effects of submersion on the body and how to handle potentially dangerous situations:
          a. What is hyperventilation and how is it avoided?
          b. What are the symptoms and consequences of hypothermia?
          c. Why is CPR training recommended for those participating in swimming and snorkeling activities?

        Adult Scouter Awards (Knots)


        Youth Awards
           Adult leaders may wear these adult leader knots to represent the following youth awards.
                     Adult leaders may not wear youth insignia (emblems or patches).

        Arrow of Light, red and green knot, green to right, No. 05018, for use by adult leaders only.
           The Arrow of Light is the highest award in Cub Scouting and can only be earned as a Webelos Scout. This is not a restricted knot, and can simply be picked up from the Scout Shop.

        Eagle Scout, cloth, red, white, and blue knot on tan, No. 05011, Scouter, above left pocket.
           The Eagle Scout Rank is the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America. Unlike the actual Eagle rank patch, this is not a restricted knot, and can simply be picked up from the Scout Shop.

        Eagle Scout (Boy Scouts) - with NESA Life Membership,
           This knot is awarded to an Eagle Scouts who further enrolls as a Life Member with NESA (National Eagle Scout Association). You may only wear one Eagle Scout knot. This knot is worn instead of, not in addition to the standard Eagle Scout knot.

         

         

        Venturing Silver Award, cloth, silver knot on green and white, green background to the wearer's right, No. 05027.
          The Venturing Silver Award is the highest award in the Venturing advancement program. This is not a restricted knot, and can simply be picked up from the Scout Shop.

        Quartermaster Award, cloth, navy blue knot on white, No. 05009, Sea Scout. The Quartermaster Award is the highest rank in Sea Scouts. This is not a restricted knot, and can simply be picked up from the Scout Shop.

        Youth Religious Award, cloth, silver knot on purple, No. 05007, may be worn by youth or adult members who earned the knot as a youth member, above left pocket. Each faith has its own requirements for earning its emblem. A knot device may be used to indicate during which level of Scouting the award was earned. Requirements for this award vary from religion to religion. For more information on the specific requirements of your faith, please click here to visit P.R.A.Y.

        James E West Fellowship Award, cloth, green and gold knot on tan, No. 05026, may be awarded to and worn by youth or adult members. Recognizes individuals who contribute $1,000 or more in cash or securities to their local council endowment trust fund. After you have made the contribution click here to download a nomination form, fill it out, collect the necessary signatures, and turn it in to your council office. If you know of a scouter who made this contribution to their local council, but for whatever reason did not fill out a form to nominate themselves for this award, you may also fill out a form to nominate them and turn it in to the council office on their behalf.

        Explorer Achievement Award - retired program, cloth, silver knot, red, white, blue embroidery, No. 05526. This was awarded through the Exploring Division prior to August 1998. The Explorer program has evolved into the present-day Venturing program.


        Note: Background can be black or dark green

        William H. Spurgeon III Award is the highest recognition for individuals and organizations contributing significant leadership to the Exploring program. Although the award may be awarded to an organization, on the direct-contact adult is entitled to wear the knot. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        Candidates for this award must be nominated.
        Self-nomination disqualifies the candidate.

        Ranger (Explorers) - retired program, This knot is given in recognition of attaining Exploring's high adventure award, the Ranger Award. If you earned your Ranger Award when you were an Explorer, you are entitled to wear this knot.The Explorer program has evolved into the present-day Venturing program.

        Ace (Air Scouts) - retired program, This knot is given in recognition of attaining Air Scout's highest rank, the Ace Award. If you earned your Ace Award when you were an Air Scout, you are entitled to wear this knot.The Air Scout, similar to the Sea Scout program, was a branch of the Explorers. However, the Air Scouts program was disbanded back in the late 1950s..















































        Cub Scot Leader Awards

        Cub Scout Leader Recognition awards are available to Cub Scout leaders who complete training, tenure, and performance requirements. These awards are presented by the local council. All of the awards require the completion of Fast Start Training, Basic Leader Training for the position, Youth Protection training, and participation in roundtables or a pow wow or University of Scouting. Some require additional supplemental training. One or two years of registered service in the appropriate position is a requirement for each award, and tenure used for one award may not be used for another.

        Note that Cub Scout Leader Awards may be worn by Boy Scout, Varsity, and Venturing leaders. Also Cub Scouts Leaders may qualify for a number of other award knots: Youth Awards, Leadership Awards, Honor Awards, Religious Awards, James West, Lifesaving - Meritorious Awards.

        Tiger Cub Den Leader Award, cloth, orange and black knot on gold, No. 17688.
           Recognizes
        Tiger Cub Den Leaders for at least one year of service, training, and meeting quality program objectives.
        Click here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Cub Scout Den Leader Award, cloth, gold knot on blue, No. 05016.
           Recognizes Wolf and Bear Cub
        Den Leaders for at least one year of service, training, and meeting quality program objectives.
        Click here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Webelos Den Leader Award, cloth, gold knot on yellow, No. 05064.
           Recognizes
        Webelos Den Leaders for at least one year of service, training, and meeting quality program objectives.
        Click here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Cubmaster Award, cloth, blue knot on yellow, No. 05022.
           Recognizes
        Cubmasters for at least two years of service, training, and meeting quality program objectives.
        Click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Cub Scouter Award, cloth, blue and gold knot on dark blue, No. 05017.
           The Cub Scouter Award recognizes an
        adult leader registered in a Cub Scout pack for at least two years, who meets specific training, and meeting quality program objectives.
        Click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Pack Trainer Award, cloth, royal blue and bright yellow on yellow background.
           The Pack Trainer Award is for a registered Cub Scout pack trainer who meets specific service, training, and quality program objectives.

        Click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Den Leader Coach Training Award - retired  Denotes two year served as a Cub Scout Den Leader Coach in a quality Pack. This knot may no longer be earned. Scouters who have previously earned this knot may continute to wear this knot.

        Leadership Awards

        Leadership Awards are available to Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, Venturing, Sea Scout, and local council leaders to recognize their length of service, training, and quality of ledership.

        Scouter's Training Award, cloth, green knot on tan, No. 05008, Scouter, above left pocket.

        Denotes two year served in any position as a registered leader in various Scouting units and positions of responsibility.   Requirements vary, depending on position, but all requirements basically amount to creation and/or maintenance of a quality scouting program.

        Boy Scout Leader Training Award: click here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Varsity Scout Leader Training Award: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Venturing Leader Training Award: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Roundtable Staff Training Award: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Scouter's Key, cloth, green and white knot on tan, green to right, No. 05006, Scouter, above left pocket.
           Recognizes certain leaders for completing at least three years of service, training, and quality program objectives.

        Scoutmaster's Key: click here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Varsity Scout Coach's Key: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Venturing Advisor's Key: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Skipper's Key: click
        here to download an application form for this award.
        Roundtable Commissioner's Key: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        District/Assistant District Commissioner's Key: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        Unit Commissioner's Key: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.
        District Committee's Key: click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Scoutmaster Award of Merit (also Varsity Scout Team Coach), cloth, white knot on tan, No. 05001. Recognizes Scoutmasters and Coaches for their tenure, training, and quality crew program.
         *  Nomination by Troop Committee Chair for PLC and Troop Comittee. 
        Scoutmaster's Award of Merit: Click
        here to download a nomination form for this award.
        Varsity Coach's Award of Merit: Click
        here to download a nomination form for this award.

         *The Unit Leader Award of Merit replaces the Scoutmaster, Varsity Team Coach, and Venturing Crew Advisor award of merit programs. This new recognition has revised requirements, and Cubmasters are also eligible for this recognition.
                   

        Unit Leader Award of Merit:  Quality unit leadership is the key to a quality unit program—and it leads to better Scout retention. Statistics show that if young people stay engaged in the program for at least five years, the BSA’s influence likely will stay with them for the rest of their lives. A quality Scouting experience will help keep Scouts in the program, and the Boy Scouts of America created the Unit Leader Award of Merit to recognize the quality unit leaders who make that happen.
          *The Unit Leader Award of Merit replaces the Scoutmaster, Varsity Team Coach, and Venturing Crew Advisor award of merit programs. This new recognition has revised requirements, and Cubmasters are also eligible for this recognition.
         Click here to download a nomination form for this award.

         

         

        The Professional Training Award may be earned by: Associate District Executives, District Executives, Senior District Executives, Exploring Executives, Senior Exploring Executives, District Directors, and Field Directors with supervisory responsibities. To earn the award, Professional staff Scouters must: complete or participate in five of eight training or coaching programs (including Wood Badge, Exploring Advanced Seminar, and National Camping School), successfully attend all three sessions of the Professional Executive Institute (PEI), and meet all critical achievements in his or her District/Division/Council for two of the three years. Click here for a list of requirements for this award.

        Venturing Advisor Award of Merit, cloth knot, white on tan, No. 05001, with Venturing device, No 00940.
          The Venturing Advisor Award of Merit recognizes Venturing Crew Advisors for tenure, training, and quality crew program.
        Click
        here to download a nomination form for this award.

        Venturing Leadership Award The Venturing Leadership Award is presented by councils, areas, regions, and the National Council to Venturers and adults who have made exceptional contributions to Venturing and who exemplify the Venturing Code. 
        If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
         * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Sea Badge, cloth, blue Neptune's trident on silver, No. 05527, Sea Scouting leader, above left pocket.
           Sea Badge is similar in scope to Wood Badge but focuses on Sea Scout skills and ideals. There are no additional requirements or signatures necessary. Completion of this course entitles you to wear this knot

        International Scouter's Award, cloth, white and purple square knot, purple worn to the right, restricted.
           The International Scouter's Award encourages Scouters to broaden their involvement in Scouting through participation in world Scouting activities and recognizes Scouters for their contributions to world Scouting.
        Click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Doctorate of Commissioner Science Award, red cloth, silver square knot, yellow border, No. 18093, Commissioners, above left pocket. Completion of Doctorate of Commissioner Science Degree.
        Click here to download a fact sheet and a list of the requirements.

        Arrowhead Honor, silver arrowhead, Commissioners, left sleeve.
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        BSA Speaker Bank In order to spread the message of Scouting, the BSA is maintaining a list of officially registered speakers to get the word out about Scouting. After a registered speaker conducts a minimum of 20 speeches and provides feedback, the speaker will receive a knot. Knot recipients will receive recognition at the National Annual Meeting. There is nothing else to do. If you are a registered BSA Speaker, and you give 20 speaches and then fill out the feedback, you will automatically be awarded this knot. Click here for a link to the official BSA Speaker's website.

        Philmont Training Center Masters, To earn this knot, you must first attend a training course at the Philmont Training Center. Then you must go back to the Philmont Training Center to take an additional course AND recruit 3 other scouts to go with you AND you must go back home and TEACH a BSA course (usually the course you took at Philmont). The course can be taught at the District, Council, Area or Regional level. Click here for a fact sheet about this award. Note: If you go back to the Philmont Training Center for a third time, and meet other requirements, you can earn a device to be worn on the knot.

         Alumni Award Knot - Activities by BSA alumni that promote Scouting. Click Alumni Award Knot for info

        Honor Awards

        These awards are not earned but instead awarded to recognize leaders for outstanding service.

        Adult Religious Award, cloth, purple knot on silver, No. 05014, may be worn by adult members presented with the recognition, above left pocket. Adults may wear both knots if they satisfy qualifying criteria. Presented for faithful service while an adult leader. Requirements for this award vary from religion to religion. For more information on the specific requirements of your faith, please click here to visit P.R.A.Y.

        Distinguished Commissioner Service Award, cloth, silver knot on red, No. 05019, Scouter, above left pocket. Recognizes the active service of Unit Commissioners, District Commissions, and commissioners for at least 5 years and in meeting other quality and training criteria. Click here to download a fact sheet and a list of the requirements.

        District Award of Merit, cloth, silver overhand knot on dark blue, ends down, No. 05013. A council award for noteworthy service at the district level. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form. Fill it out, and turn it in to your District Training Chair.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Silver Beaver Award, cloth, blue and white knot on tan, blue to right, No. 05003. Established in 1931, the Silver Beaver Award is presented for distinguished service to young people within a BSA local council. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form. Fill it out, and turn it in to your District Training Chair.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Silver Antelope Award, cloth, gold and white knot on tan, gold to right, No. 05012A. The Silver Antelope Award, created in 1942, is granted for outstanding service to youth within the territory of a BSA region. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form. Fill it out, and turn it in to your District Training Chair.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Silver Buffalo Award, cloth, red and white knot on tan, red to right, No. 05004. The Silver Buffalo Award, created in 1925, is bestowed upon those who give truly noteworthy and extraordinary service to youth at the national level. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate..

        Silver World Award, cloth, red and white stripes, world, two stars are worn to the wearer's right, No. 05019. The Silver World Award, conceived in 1971, is presented by the BSA to world citizens who give outstanding service to their nation's youth or to young people in other countries. There are no specific requirements for this award, and there is no form to fill out. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then write a detailed letter of nomination, explaining what you believe are this person's qualifications, and why you think they should recieve this award. Then turn your nomination letter into your local Scout Executive for processing.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.
        .

        Order of the Arrow Distinguished Service Award, cloth, white knot on red, No. 05528, Scout or Scouter, restricted. The Distinguished Service Award was created in 1940 to honor those who rendered service to the Order of the Arrow beyond the lodge level. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Distinguished Eagle Scout Award, is the Eagle Scout knot (No. 05011) worn with the DESA miniature pin, No. 00094.
           The Eagle Scout recipient must have gained status of fame or eminence in their life work, and have shared their talents with their communities on a voluntary basis.

        George Meany Award cloth, blue knot on red and white, restricted.
          The George Meany Award is a national recognition presented to an adult union member who has made a significant contribution to the youth of their community through Scouting. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Hornaday Award, cloth, blue, green, and white knot on tan. 
          It recognizes unusual and distinguished service in natural resource conservation and environmental improvement at the regional, national, or international level.
        Click
        here to download a Progress Record application card for this award.

        Whitney M Young Jr. Service Award Recognizes outstanding services by an adult individual or an organization for demonstrated involvement in the development and implementation of Scouting opportunities for youth from rural or low-income urban backgrounds. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here for a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        ¡Scouting ... Vale la pena! Service Award Recognizes outstanding services by an adult individual or an organization for demonstrated involvement in the development and implementation of Scouting opportunities for Hispanic American/Latino youth. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here for the nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Asian American Spirit of Scouting Service Award Recognizes outstanding services by an adult individual or an organization for demonstrated involvement in the development and implementation of Scouting opportunities for Asian American youth. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here for the nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.


        Support of Scouting

        William D. Boyce Award, cloth, gray knot, gold, green, and red embroidery, No. 14269, Scouter, above left pocket.
           The William D. Boyce New-Unit Organizer Award is presented to recognize volunteers who organize one or more traditional Scouting units. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here and fill out the form and turn it in to the District Committee Chair. You may nominate yourself or others for this award by simply downloading the form, filling it out, and turning it in to your District Committee Chair.

        Community Organization Award, This square knot is worn by those whom have received an award from en external community organization, specifically recognized by the BSA's Relationships Division, while serving as an adult member of the BSA.
           This award is NOT a BSA award; it represents an award presented by some other community service, fraternal, corporate or governmental organization to one of its members for making significant contributions toward the education, service and/or devotion to youth through scouting. In recognition of being a recipient of one of these awards, BSA then allows you to sew this knot on your uniform

         

        There are currently twelve awards which fall into this classification. Eleven of them wear the Community Organization Award knot:

        The twelth, The George Meany Award of the American Federation of Labor & Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) is also part of this category, but retains the use of the original square knot designed for the Meany Award. Occasionally, a recipient of the Meany Award, at their discression, they may choose to wear the more generic Community Organization Award knot instead of the specific Meany knot, but they may NOT wear both (unless, of course, they happen to be a recipient of BOTH the Meany, and one of the other eleven recognized community organization awards). Click here for a general fact sheet on this award.

         

         

         

         

         

         

         





        Lifesaving or Meritorious Action Awards

        Bravery Awards can be awarded to a youth or adult member and are some of the few knots that can be worn by a youth.

        Medal of Merit, cloth, gold and blue on tan, blue to right, No. 05025. The Medal of Merit may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has performed some outstanding act of service of a rare or exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the well-being of others. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate..

        Heroism Award, cloth, red on white twill, No. 05020. The Heroism Award may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save life at minimum risk to self. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.

        Honor Medal, cloth, red knot on tan, No. 05010. The Honor Medal may be awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated unusual heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save life at considerable risk to self. If you feel you know of someone deserving, then click here to download a nomination form.
        * Self-nomination automatically disqualifies a candidate.













        ________________________________________________________________________

        Knot Devices

        The following devices may be worn on knots, as appropriate.   

        Boy Scouts Cub Scouts  Webelos Device Webelos
        District/Council Commissioners Sea Scouts
        Varsity Explorers

          Venturing

        1910 Society Founders Circle Device Founders Circle
        Distinguished Eagle Scout Device 
        Distinguished Eagle Scout

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         
        These devices should be stocked by your local Scout Shop or council trading post, along with all other advancement items. They are not be available at commercial Scout supply distributors.

        The first four, below, are used on the universal youth religious award knot
        The others, along with the Cub Scout, Boy Scout, and Venturing devices are worn on Training Awards and Scouter's Keys.
        The Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Varsity, and Venturing devices are also used on the W. D. Boyce New Unit Organizer Award.
        The BSA Stock numbers for these devices are as follows:

        Cub Scout device No. 00926
        Webelos device No. 00932
        Boy Scout device No. 00927
        Venturing device No. 00930
        Varsity Scout device No. 00928
        Sea Scouting device
        (Formerly called Sea Exploring)
        No. 00931
        Commissioner device No. 00871
        District Committee device No. 00872

        The Exploring Device shown is no longer listed in the Insignia Guide. It had the same stock number as the current Venturing Device (No. 00930), and may no longer be available.

        KNOT DEVICES

           When an award is given to a Scout or Scouter that also has a related square knot, the knot may be worn by itself on the uniform or with one of the devices depicted above to indicate the program phase where the award was earned. For example, a Unit Commissioner that earns the Commissioner Key (same knot as the Scouter Key) would wear the Commissioner device. If a Scout or Scouter earns a subsequent award represented by the same knot, the Scout or Scouter should wear a device for each program phase where the knot was earned (you do not wear multiple issues of the same knot). In particular, a Scout that earns a sequence of religious emblems would wear ONE universal religious emblem knot and up to four devices, as described below.

        • Wear the CUB SCOUT device for the first level emblem (God & Me, Maccabee, etc.) earned as a Tiger Cub or Cub Scout;
        • Wear the WEBELOS SCOUT device for the second level emblem (God & Family, Parvuli Dei, Aleph, etc.) earned as a Cub Scout or Webelos Scout;
        • Wear the BOY SCOUT device for the first level emblem (God & Church, Ad Altare Dei, Ner Tamid, etc.) earned as a Boy Scout;
        • Wear the VENTURING device for the second level emblem (God & Life, Pope Pius XII, Etz Chaim, etc.) earned as an older Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, Sea Scout, or Venturer.

        Note that Webelos Scout and Venturing devices are used to designate the second level emblems described above, EVEN IF the boy isn't a Webelos Scout and/or Venturer when the member earns the appropriate religious emblem.


         

        There are two additional devices, not shown above, that are worn on the James West Fellowship Knot, to recognize major donors, the 1910 Society pin and the Founders Circle pin.  Those devices and the qualifications for them can be seen on the page that describes the James West Fellowship Knot, by clicking here.

        There is also a special device for the Third level Philmont Training Center Masters Award. That device and the qualifications for it can be seen on the page that describes the Philmont Training Center Masters Award by clicking here.




        How to Wear Your Knots

        Is there a right way (and a wrong way) to wear knots? Yes there is.

        Illustration of loop

        "Bight to the Right"
        "The loop (TOP Bight) of the embroidered square knot that comes in FRONT of the standing part (the part to the left as you are looking at it) is ALWAYS to the wearer's right."
        (In other words, the loop (the top bight) "tells you which side is "up" on the knot since it is always found on the RIGHT SIDE AS YOU WEAR IT ON THE UNIFORM and on the LEFT SIDE AS YOU ARE LOOKING AT IT.)
         

        Knot Placement

         

        Download Progress Records for:

         

        Scoutmaster's Key Venturing Advisor's Key District Committee Key
        Unit Commissioner's Key District Commissioner's Key Roundtable Commissioner's Key
        Varsity Scout Coach's Key Asst District Commissioner's Key Sea Scout Skipper's Key
        Boy Scout Leader Award Venturing Leader Award Roundtable Staff Award
        Varsity Scout Coach Award Sea Scouter's Award
        Scoutmaster Award of Merit Venturing Advisor Award of Merit Varsity Coach Award of Merit

        100 Years of Scouting



        Celebrating 100 Years - A Year of Celebration
        For 100 years, the Boy Scouts of America has created a strong foundation of leadership, service, and community for millions of America's youth. Through A Year of Celebration, A Century of Making a Difference, we will demonstrate the incredible impact of a century of living the Scout Law.

        Program participants will earn recognition for making a difference in their communities due to their dedication to five of Scouting's core values: Leadership, Character, Community Service, Achievement, and the Outdoors. Through that commitment, participants can earn each of five award ribbons to display from our 100th Anniversary commemorative patch.

        A Year of Celebration will take place from September 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010.
        The program is open to all Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venturers, adult leaders, and Scouting alumni.
        Read the patch requirements to learn more.

        FINISHED WITH REQUIREMENTS? CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE YEAR OF CELEBRATION AWARDS.Questions about the ordering process? Click here for answers to some of the most commonly asked.

        You can also download the patch requirements by group:

        Worksheets available at: http://usscouts.org/awards.asp

        For 100 years, the Boy Scouts of America has created a strong foundation of leadership, service, and community for America's youth. Through A Year of Celebration, we celebrate this legacy and commit ourselves to inspire and prepare future generations.
         Visit BSA's 100 Years of Scouting Home page
        100 Years